credit

aceofstars:

grandboischeriludenberg:

THIS IS NOT A DRILL, JUNJI ITO IS DOING A COLLAB WITH POKEMON AND PROBABLY DRAWING A YONKOMA CHECK IT OUT YOU: http://www.pokemon.jp/special/kowapoke/

OHHH MY GOD OH MMY GOD OH MY GOD?? OH MY GOD????? OH MY GOD

hassavocado:

queen-hylia:

Twilight Princess Concept Art: Midna's design sketches 2/2

my least fav thing abt the hyrule historia is they dont list the names of the artists/character designers? i always wondered if the twilight princess designs were just a result of the ocarina of time/majoras artist working digitally

darthsophie:

I love this film so much.

nursingmemes:

It’s called fall because everything is falling… leaves, temperature, bank account, gpa, self esteem

koroke:

i feel so powerful

koroke:

i feel so powerful

im-a-motherfucking-bald-eagle:

nock-nock-nock:

『 海月姫 / Princess Jellyfish 』 (Film 2014)

AAAAAAAAAAA

dorianpavustache:

i seriously love city elves so much like they’re outcasts no matter where they go the dalish call them flat ears the humans alienate them and they are poor and they are the worst by everybody’s standards and they are like fuck you we’re elves we’re proud we will create our own culture WE BOW TO NO ONE

weloveshortvideos:

Random crow shows up on dude’s porch, looks him straight in the face and says ‘fuck you’

❝ We never say that all men deserve to feel beautiful. We never say that each man is beautiful in his own way. We don’t have huge campaigns aimed at young boys trying to convince them that they’re attractive, probably because we very rarely correlate a man’s worth with his appearance. The problem is that a woman’s value in this world is still very much attached to her appearance, and telling her that she should or deserves to feel beautiful does more to promote that than negate it. Telling women that they “deserve” to feel pretty plays right in to the idea that prettiness should be important to them. And having books and movies aimed at young women where every female protagonist turns out to be beautiful (whereas many of the antagonists are described in much less flattering terms) reinforces the message that beauty has some kind of morality attached to it, and that all heroines are somehow pretty.
You Don’t Have To Be Pretty – On YA Fiction And Beauty As A Priority | The Belle Jar (via brutereason)
victoriousvocabulary:

SCHLAFLÄHMUNG
[noun]
sleep paralysis - a phenomenon in which people, either when falling asleep or wakening, temporarily experience an inability to move. More formally, it is a transition state between wakefulness and rest characterised by complete muscle atonia (muscle weakness). It can occur at sleep onset or upon awakening, and it is often associated with terrifying visions (e.g. an intruder in the room), to which one is unable to react due to paralysis. Sleep paralysis has been linked to disorders such as narcolepsy, migraines, anxiety disorders, and obstructive sleep apnea; however, it can also occur in isolation. When linked to another disorder, sleep paralysis commonly occurs in association with the neuromuscular disorder narcolepsy.
Some features of sleep paralysis:
- Eye movements are typically preserved. It more often occurs while sleeping on one’s back.
- Visual and auditory hallucinations often occur and may include a sense of an evil presence, of being touched, or hearing voices or noises in the room.
- Occasionally faces or people may be seen at the bedside.
- A sense of breathlessness (or chest pressure, even someone standing on one’s chest) may exist.
It is common and may be experienced by 20% to 60% of people, depending on the population examined. In a study of college students, 21% were found to have had at least one episode of sleep paralysis, but only 4% had 5 or more episodes. It is believed to be precipitated by sleep deprivation, stress, and sleep schedule disruption. In experiments, it has been shown to occur with disruption of rapid eye movement (REM), or dream sleep. 
Etymology: German Schlaf, “sleep” + Lähmung “paralysis” (from lähmen, “paralysis” and ung, suffix forming nouns from verbs).
[Lenka Simeckova - Sleep Paralysis] [1] [2]

victoriousvocabulary:

SCHLAFLÄHMUNG

[noun]

sleep paralysis - a phenomenon in which people, either when falling asleep or wakening, temporarily experience an inability to move. More formally, it is a transition state between wakefulness and rest characterised by complete muscle atonia (muscle weakness). It can occur at sleep onset or upon awakening, and it is often associated with terrifying visions (e.g. an intruder in the room), to which one is unable to react due to paralysis. Sleep paralysis has been linked to disorders such as narcolepsy, migraines, anxiety disorders, and obstructive sleep apnea; however, it can also occur in isolation. When linked to another disorder, sleep paralysis commonly occurs in association with the neuromuscular disorder narcolepsy.

Some features of sleep paralysis:

- Eye movements are typically preserved. It more often occurs while sleeping on one’s back.

- Visual and auditory hallucinations often occur and may include a sense of an evil presence, of being touched, or hearing voices or noises in the room.

- Occasionally faces or people may be seen at the bedside.

- A sense of breathlessness (or chest pressure, even someone standing on one’s chest) may exist.

It is common and may be experienced by 20% to 60% of people, depending on the population examined. In a study of college students, 21% were found to have had at least one episode of sleep paralysis, but only 4% had 5 or more episodes. It is believed to be precipitated by sleep deprivation, stress, and sleep schedule disruption. In experiments, it has been shown to occur with disruption of rapid eye movement (REM), or dream sleep. 

Etymology: German Schlaf, “sleep” + Lähmung “paralysis” (from lähmen, “paralysis” and ung, suffix forming nouns from verbs).

[Lenka Simeckova - Sleep Paralysis[1] [2]